On Incomplete HTTP Reads and the Requests Library In Python

The requests library is arguably the mostly widely used HTTP library for Python. However, what I believe most of its users are not aware of is that its current stable version happily accepts responses whose length is less than what is given in the Content-Length header. If you are not careful enough to check this by yourself, you may end up using corrupted data without even noticing. I have witnessed this first-hand, which is the reason for the present blog post. Let’s see why the current requests version does not do this checking (spoiler: it is a feature, not a bug) and how to check this manually in your scripts.
Read More

Implementing multiprocessing.pool.ThreadPool from Python in Rust

In this post, we will implement multiprocessing.pool.ThreadPool from Python in Rust. It represents a thread-oriented version of multiprocessing.Pool, which offers a convenient means of parallelizing the execution of a function across multiple input values by distributing the input data across processes. We will use an existing thread-pool implementation and focus on adjusting its interface to match that of multiprocessing.pool.ThreadPool.
Read More

Ensuring That a Linux Program Is Running at Most Once by Using Abstract Sockets

It is often useful to have a way of ensuring that a program is running at most once (e.g. a system daemon or Cron job). Unfortunately, most commonly used solutions are not without problems. In this post, I show a simple, reliable, Linux-only solution that utilizes Unix domain sockets and the abstract socket namespace. The post includes a sample implementation in the Rust programming language.
Read More